Welcome to appliedethics.us



APPLIED ETHICS.US




Established April 6, 2004

AARON LEE GIVAN, Ph.D.,
Copyright. 2004. Aaron Givan.
All rights reserved.

[e-teachingandlearning.biz]

...................................
"ACT TO LEAD! LEAD TO ACT!"

VISION STATEMENT:
Be well! Do the right thing with beauty and meaning in mind.

MISSION STATEMENT:
Foster goodness, loyalty, and new knowledge.

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ETHICS IN AMERICAN LIFE

(Since 1978)
[Founded 9/15/2003]

FOCUS: Theory, education, and application of ethics in American culture.

Aspects/Concentrations:

1. Medical Ethics
2. Values and Ethics
3. Ethics in Society4. Multicultural Ethics
5. Ethics in Education
6. Computers and Society
7. Business Ethics
8. Social Responsibility & Ethics in Management
9. Vocational Ethics for Professionals
10. Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures

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SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS

(Copyright, 2003. Aaron Givan)


[Number Code: Sample-1.1.1
1.x.x-The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x-The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1-Individual, 2-Group, 3-Global.
x.x.1-The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


1.1.1-Values and Ethics
1.1.2-Affirmative Action
1.1.3-Glass Ceiling
1.1.4-Ethical Relativism
1.1.5-Ethics in Education
1.1.6-Computer Seizures
1.1.7-Male-Female Relationships
1.1.8-Medical Information
1.1.9-Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures
1.1.10-Harassment
1.1.11-Women’s Rights in Reproduction
1.1.12-Tobacco Use and Advertising


1.2.1-Computer Virus
1.2.2-Random Drug Testing
1.2.3-Genetic Screening of Employees
1.2.4-Child Punishment/Discipline
1.2.5-Teaching and Learning
1.2.6-Minority Relations
1.2.7-Selective Health Care Delivery
1.2.8-Indigenous Resistence/Violence
1.2.9-Assisted Suicide for the Terminally Ill
1.2.10-People (Stakeholders) or Profits (Stockholders)
1.2.11-Legal Paternalism
1.2.12-Interracial Communities


1.3.1-Whistleblowing
1.3.2-Charitable Support of the Poor by the Fortunate
1.3.3-Copyright and Technology
1.3.4-Disabled People’s Rights
1.3.5-Genetically Modified Food
1.3.6-Bribery and International Business
1.3.7-Corporate Responsibility
1.3.8-Patriarchal Society, Civil Society and Global Development
1.3.9-National Identification Systems for Individuals
1.3.10-Environmental Pollution
1.3.11-Governmental Ethical Decline
1.3.12-Cultural Religious Values and Exclusivity in Global Development


SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample-1.1.1
1.x.x-The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x-The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1-Individual, 2-Group, 3-Global.
x.x.1-The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


2.1.1-Computers and Society
2.1.2-Privacy and Technology
2.1.3-Age of Moral Accountability
2.1.4-Gender Based Discrimination
2.1.5-Social Responsibility and Ethics in Management
2.1.6-Human Sterilization
2.1.7-Character Education
2.1.8-Racism/Racial Discrimination
2.1.9-Multicultural Ethics
2.1.10-Rape Victim Abortions
2.1.11-Adoption
2.1.12-Sexism


2.2.1-Hacking
2.2.2-Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s)
2.2.3-Child Care/Abuse
2.2.4-Character Education Providers
2.2.5-Wage Parity
2.2.6-Single Parent Families
2.2.7-Medical Trials of New Drugs
2.2.8-Data Base Abuse
2.2.9-Hiring Quotas
2.2.10-Civil Disobedience
2.2.11-Seclusion of Women
2.2.12-Racial Abuse Restitution


2.3.1-Social Justice
2.3.2-Encryption and Secrecy
2.3.3-Practicing the Professions-Related Ethics
2.3.4-Profitability
2.3.5-Cloning Animals for Food Consumption
2.3.6-Acceptable Risk
2.3.7-Multinational Corporations (MNC’s)
2.3.8-Slavery
2.3.9-Global Ethical Responsibility
2.3.10-Human Rights
2.3.11-Global Labor Practices
2.3.12-Euthanasia


SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample-1.1.1
1.x.x-The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x-The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1-Individual, 2-Group, 3-Global.
x.x.1-The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


3.1.1-Ethics in Society
3.1.2-Contextual Roots of Ethics
3.1.3-Individual Ethics Decline
3.1.4-Equity in Disciplinary Penalties in the Work Place
3.1.5-Business Ethics
3.1.6-Surveillance
3.1.7-Deceptive Advertising
3.1.8-Sex and the Genders
3.1.9-Vocational Ethics for Professionals
3.1.10-Morality and Ethics
3.1.11-Reverse Discrimination
3.1.12-Ethnic Discrimination


3.2.1-Children and the Web
3.2.2-Social Security Number Use
3.2.3-Employee Monitoring at Work
3.2.4-Age Discrimination
3.2.5-Abortion On Demand
3.2.6-Suicide
3.2.7-Capital Punishment
3.2.8-Elder Care
3.2.9-Multiculturalism
3.2.10-Reparations for Ethnically Abused Groups
3.2.11-Moral Collapse of the Culture
3.2.12-Terrorism Used for Political Change


3.3.1-Email SPAM
3.3.2-Computer Software Testing
3.3.3-Sexual Equality and Family Structures
3.3.4-Law Enforcement Practices
3.3.5-Women’s Rights
3.3.6-Global Availability of Medicine
3.3.7-Pandemics
3.3.8-Economic Justice
3.3.9-Universal Ethics
3.3.10-Corporate Ethics Decline
3.3.11-International Business Ethics
3.3.12-Government Corruption and International Business

CHOOSING A TOPIC-CLASS:
1. Choose a topic that interests you for each 16 week study event from one of the three alternate topic-class lists that are attached (this is a 4 page document): pick a topic from each of the categories in rotation each year-(1) individual, (2) group, and (3) global.
2. Structure, with the help of your mentor at the beginning of the 16 weeks, a learning contract, syllabus, and appropriate study materials-text and/or articles. For a 3 hr class, include a 10 page research paper OR a field experience (requires a 5 page summary report/presentation).
For a one hr class: a five page paper OR short field experience with a 5 page report.

EVALUATION MECHANISMS:
1. Letter: S (Satisfactory)/U (Unsatisfactory) and/or
2. Rubrics’ critique of (A) Field Demo Presentation or (B) Portfolio.
CLASS SCHEDULING CYCLE:
Classes start on the first Monday of each odd numbered month; that is, Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., & Nov.

TUITION RATES:
Each certified/semester hour is $275.00/hour; that is, $275.00 for a one hour class, $825.00 for a 3 hour class.


TRAINING IN APPLIED ETHICS-POLICIES AND PROCEDURES (TAEPP)

(Copyright. 2003. Aaron Givan, Ph.D. All rights reserved.)


VISION STATEMENT: Be well! Do the right thing with beauty and meaning in mind.

MISSION STATEMENT: Use meta-ethics [ethics about ethics] to get people started in
the application of ethics in the tasks of living through flexible learning opportunities including transdisciplinary experiences within a two-level certification program and a masters in applied/professional ethics degree.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the Training in Applied Ethics Program are to:
1. Enable individuals to reason clearly in the tasks of living using applied ethics.
2. Familiarize people with the ethical knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA’s) to enable personal and professional growth while contributing to the common good.
3. Encourage personal involvement and improvement, meaningful research, and intellectual achievement, in ethical problems at the individual, group, and global levels.
4. Promote lifelong appreciation for and learning about using applied ethics.

GENERIC TOPIC/CLASS DESCRIPTION: Applied ethics training classes emphasize principles of ethical development using appropriate ethical theories/models in real time situations and provide opportunities for developing a personalized approach with direct and immediate applications.

GENERIC COURSE GOALS:
1. Acquire a functional use of applied ethics concepts and practices.
2. Identify the constraints and extensions/refinements of applied ethics.
3. Explore, define and apply personal preferences for using applied ethics in specific situations.
4. Identify and refine one’s personal theory-model of applied ethics.
5. Discuss direct and immediate uses of applied ethics using feedback & critique mechanisms.
6. Identify personally beneficial options and possible implications for using applied ethics for personal and professional growth and lifelong learning.
7. Evaluate and act on new and refined learning in applied ethics.

TRAINING LEVELS:
1. Associate: Complete 1 certified hour of study for 16 weeks, 3 times per year for 2 years + 3 hr field project: total of 9 certified/equivalent semester hours.
2. Fellow: Complete 3 certified hours of study for 16 weeks, 3 times per year for two years +2 hr field project: total of 20 certified/equivalent semester hours.
Expected study time per certified/semester hour equivalent: 30 clock hours online-offline.

CHOOSING A TOPIC-CLASS:
1. Choose a topic that interests you for each 16 week study event from one of the three alternate topic-class lists that are attached (this is a 4 page document): pick a topic from each of the categories in rotation each year-(1) individual, (2) group, and (3) global.
2. Structure, with the help of your mentor at the beginning of the 16 weeks, a learning contract, syllabus, and appropriate study materials-text and/or articles. For a 3 hr class, include a 10 page research paper OR a field experience (requires a 5 page summary report/presentation).
For a one hr class: a five page paper OR short field experience with a 5 page report.

EVALUATION MECHANISMS:
1. Letter: S (Satisfactory)/U (Unsatisfactory) and/or
2. Rubrics’ critique of (A) Field Demo Presentation or (B) Portfolio.
CLASS SCHEDULING CYCLE:
Classes start on the first Monday of each odd numbered month; that is, Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., & Nov.
TUITION RATES: (Subject to change without notice):
Each certified/semester hour is $275.00/hour; that is, $275.00 for a one hour class, $825.00 for a 3 hour class.


SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample-1.1.1
1.x.x-The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x-The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1-Individual, 2-Group, 3-Global.
x.x.1-The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


1.1.1-Values and Ethics
1.1.2-Affirmative Action
1.1.3-Glass Ceiling
1.1.4-Ethical Relativism
1.1.5-Ethics in Education
1.1.6-Computer Seizures
1.1.7-Male-Female Relationships
1.1.8-Medical Information
1.1.9-Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures
1.1.10-Harassment
1.1.11-Women’s Rights in Reproduction
1.1.12-Tobacco Use and Advertising


1.2.1-Computer Virus
1.2.2-Random Drug Testing
1.2.3-Genetic Screening of Employees
1.2.4-Child Punishment/Discipline
1.2.5-Teaching and Learning
1.2.6-Minority Relations
1.2.7-Selective Health Care Delivery
1.2.8-Indigenous Resistence/Violence
1.2.9-Assisted Suicide for the Terminally Ill
1.2.10-People (Stakeholders) or Profits (Stockholders)
1.2.11-Legal Paternalism
1.2.12-Interracial Communities


1.3.1-Whistleblowing
1.3.2-Charitable Support of the Poor by the Fortunate
1.3.3-Copyright and Technology
1.3.4-Disabled People’s Rights
1.3.5-Genetically Modified Food
1.3.6-Bribery and International Business
1.3.7-Corporate Responsibility
1.3.8-Patriarchal Society, Civil Society and Global Development
1.3.9-National Identification Systems for Individuals
1.3.10-Environmental Pollution
1.3.11-Governmental Ethical Decline
1.3.12-Cultural Religious Values and Exclusivity in Global Development


SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample-1.1.1
1.x.x-The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x-The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1-Individual, 2-Group, 3-Global.
x.x.1-The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


2.1.1-Computers and Society
2.1.2-Privacy and Technology
2.1.3-Age of Moral Accountability
2.1.4-Gender Based Discrimination
2.1.5-Social Responsibility and Ethics in Management
2.1.6-Human Sterilization
2.1.7-Character Education
2.1.8-Racism/Racial Discrimination
2.1.9-Multicultural Ethics
2.1.10-Rape Victim Abortions
2.1.11-Adoption
2.1.12-Sexism


2.2.1-Hacking
2.2.2-Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s)
2.2.3-Child Care/Abuse
2.2.4-Character Education Providers
2.2.5-Wage Parity
2.2.6-Single Parent Families
2.2.7-Medical Trials of New Drugs
2.2.8-Data Base Abuse
2.2.9-Hiring Quotas
2.2.10-Civil Disobedience
2.2.11-Seclusion of Women
2.2.12-Racial Abuse Restitution


2.3.1-Social Justice
2.3.2-Encryption and Secrecy
2.3.3-Practicing the Professions-Related Ethics
2.3.4-Profitability
2.3.5-Cloning Animals for Food Consumption
2.3.6-Acceptable Risk
2.3.7-Multinational Corporations (MNC’s)
2.3.8-Slavery
2.3.9-Global Ethical Responsibility
2.3.10-Human Rights
2.3.11-Global Labor Practices
2.3.12-Euthanasia


SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS


[Number Code: Sample-1.1.1
1.x.x-The first number in the sequence identifies one of three possible alternative topic listings/cycles.
x.1.x-The second number in the sequence identifies the focus/emphasis on the topic from a particular perspective: 1-Individual, 2-Group, 3-Global.
x.x.1-The third number (1-12) identifies the number of the specific topic in that specific focus/emphasis.]


3.1.1-Ethics in Society
3.1.2-Contextual Roots of Ethics
3.1.3-Individual Ethics Decline
3.1.4-Equity in Disciplinary Penalties in the Work Place
3.1.5-Business Ethics
3.1.6-Surveillance
3.1.7-Deceptive Advertising
3.1.8-Sex and the Genders
3.1.9-Vocational Ethics for Professionals
3.1.10-Morality and Ethics
3.1.11-Reverse Discrimination
3.1.12-Ethnic Discrimination


3.2.1-Children and the Web
3.2.2-Social Security Number Use
3.2.3-Employee Monitoring at Work
3.2.4-Age Discrimination
3.2.5-Abortion On Demand
3.2.6-Suicide
3.2.7-Capital Punishment
3.2.8-Elder Care
3.2.9-Multiculturalism
3.2.10-Reparations for Ethnically Abused Groups
3.2.11-Moral Collapse of the Culture
3.2.12-Terrorism Used for Political Change


3.3.1-Email SPAM
3.3.2-Computer Software Testing
3.3.3-Sexual Equality and Family Structures
3.3.4-Law Enforcement Practices
3.3.5-Women’s Rights
3.3.6-Global Availability of Medicine
3.3.7-Pandemics
3.3.8-Economic Justice
3.3.9-Universal Ethics
3.3.10-Corporate Ethics Decline
3.3.11-International Business Ethics
3.3.12-Government Corruption and International Business


10 BENEFITS WITHIN THE TAEPP PROGRAM


1. Emphasis on diversity of topics within each yearly cycle: includes individual, group, and global views of ethical problems.
2. Flexibility of training levels:
a. Initial: Associate (9 hours towards Masters)
Fellow (20 hours towards Masters)
b. Secondary:
Masters (60 hour)
Diplomat (Two 2-hour field projects-one per year: post masters)
3. Customization/Personalization: student choice of topic-classes: recycled with each new class as learning levels within the program advance.
4. Negotiated learning contract, syllabus, and learning materials within each class.
5. Choice of research formats for project: Written paper or field project with report/demo/portfolio.
6. Multiple Evaluation Options: Letter-Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U); Rubrics for Field Demo/Portfolio
7. Final Presentation for Synthesis in each class: Proctored written essay experience OR orals via phone in front of a proctor.
8. One separate field project per year at site participant’s choosing: this capstone experience can personalize the year’s learnings.
9. Multiple staring times per year-every two month’s.
10. Reasonable Tuition for the diversity/flexibility of learnings offered.

**************
DISCLAIMER: These class titles and descriptions were created in 2003; the author reserves the right to structure and use these syllabi, and other like documents produced earlier or at a later date, at his sole discretion singley or in mulitple combinations and at single/simultaneous teaching sites as deemed appropriate.





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CLASSES IN APPLIED ETHICS:
(Copyright. 2004. Aaron Givan.)



ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES

4/15/2004


STRUCTURE:

There are twelve classes in the class listing; see class list for title and descriptions.

The classes are structured at three levels:

---ETH5000: Initial level

---ETH6000: Intermediate level

---ETH7000: Advanced level

Seven (7) of the twelve classes are required to complete the program.
All classes are 10 weeks long and structured for 3 semester hours equivalency/credit. Tuition is $150.00 per hour or $450.00 per class.


The classes are delivered totally ONLINE.


PROGRAM OF STUDY REQUIREMENTS:

1. Classes required of all participants:

---ETH5003-Freedom, Ethics and Free Enterprise
---ETH5014-Values, Ethics, and Character Development
---ETH7037-Internship/Practicum/Fieldwork/Residency in Applied Ethics

2. Electives: Choose any three of the following:

---ETH5021-Modern Social Dilemmas
---ETH5033-Technology, Computing and 21st Century Development
---ETH6015-Ethics in Education
---ETH6023-Ethics Across Cultures
---ETH6031-Healthcare Ethics in the Global Village
---ETH6042-Applied Business Ethics

3. Advanced Electives: Choose one of the following:

---ETH7009-Ethical Management Practices Within Society
---ETH7025-Vocational Ethics for Professionals
---ETH7031-Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures



CLASSES IN APPLIED ETHICS:
CLASS NUMBER/TITLE

4/15/2004


STRUCTURE:

There are twelve classes in the class listing; see class list for title and descriptions.

The classes are structured at three levels:

---ETH5000: Initial level

---ETH6000: Intermediate level

---ETH7000: Advanced level


1. ETH5003-Freedom, Ethics and Free Enterprise
2. ETH5014-Values, Ethics, and Character Development
3. ETH5021-Modern Social Dilemmas
4. ETH5033-Technology, Computing and 21st Century Development
5. ETH6015-Ethics in Education
6. ETH6023-Ethics Across Cultures
7. ETH6031-Healthcare Ethics in the Global Village
8. ETH6042-Applied Business Ethics
9. ETH7009-Ethical Management Practices Within Society
10. ETH7025-Vocational Ethics for Professionals
11. ETH7031-Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures
12. ETH7037-Internship/Practicum/Field Work/Residency in Applied
Ethics


CLASSES IN APPLIED ETHICS:
CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

4/15/2004


CLASS DESCRIPTIONS:

1. ETH5003-Freedom, Ethics and Free Enterprise


2. ETH5014-Values, Ethics, and Character Development

ETH5014 considers values, ethical, and character issues as they apply to personal preferences within the context of personal and societal development with a special emphasis on practical applied ethics. Stresses the importance of character education. Offers opportunities for in-depth, analytical case studies.

3. ETH5021-Modern Social Dilemmas

ETH5021 provides the student with modern social dilemmas which supply
research opportunities that focus on the essentials of how ethical applications may better direct human behaviors in their social-cultural environments.
Reasoning assumptions and decision practices using ethical codes are explored.

4. ETH5033-Technology, Computing and 21st Century Development

ETH5033 examines the consequences of the use of technology and computing within modern communities and questions the impact of how issues are defined, researched and used for the making and use of public policy and the development of civil society. Ethical principles are applied to varied aspects of such policy decisions.

5. ETH6015-Ethics in Education

ETH6015 explores the appropriate place and use of ethical principles within the theory and practice of education from K-12 and beyond. The assumptions underlying curriculum development, technology in education, lifelong learning, and other such issues are related to how ethical mechanisms might foster educational reform.

6. ETH6023-Ethics Across Cultures

ETH6023 provides a survey of essential cultural values and how ethical questions are framed according to cultural preferences. Questions of ethical/social interest are studied with practical applications in local settings required for the integration of personal and academic insights.

7. ETH6031-Healthcare Ethics in the Global Village

ETH6031 is a study of the use of medical ethics in the daily treatment of illness and the fostering of preventive medicine models that might foster wellness in the global community. Usable insights and comprehensive analysis of historical and current ethical healthcare questions are explored.

8. ETH6042-Applied Business Ethics

ETH6042 presents discussion and research opportunities of relevant business dilemmas resulting from rapid technological and global growth in business in the 21st century. Comprehensive analysis and creative interventions are accented with an eye towards the development of marketable artifacts as a by-product of the class work.

9. ETH7009-Ethical Management Practices Within Society

ETH7009 explores the different possibilities of the responsible application of ethical management principles and practices within a variety of socially challenging paradoxes that currently confront modern business. By researching ethical case studies and local situations, this class will enable the student to form workable, ethical management practices.

10. ETH7025-Vocational Ethics for Professionals

ETH7025 introduces the learner to the personal and professional questions that confront the worker in complex cultural-business situations. The assumptions of vocation as a life-time commitment are related to the practical demands of the bottom line. An emphasis on meaningfulness and wellness is considered.

11. ETH7031-Ethical Training and Development for Business Cultures

ETH7031 focuses on the essentials of ethical training for the working individual within the larger context of task groups typical of present business cultures.
Self-development and group growth using appropriate ethical assumptions and guidelines attempt to foster maturity and wisdom within business cultures that strongly influence the larger culture and civil society.

12. ETH7037-Internship/Practicum/Field Work/Residency in Applied Ethics

ETH7037 requires the use of accumulated program learnings to be applied in a real time setting that offers the potential for growth and creative interventions. Emphasis is placed upon the production of a usable/marketable artifact [service/product] that can serve as a capstone and authentication of the training that has been completed.\

*********************

DISCLAIMER: These class titles and descriptions were created on 4/15/2004; the author reserves the right to structure and use these syllabi, and other like documents produced earlier or at a later date, at his sole discretion singley or in mulitple combinations and at single/simultaneous teaching sites as deemed appropriate. --12/15/2004



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APPROACHES TO LEARNING
Aaron Givan, Ph.D.
(Copyright. 2002. Aaron Givan.)


Personal Journey

For me, learning is a lifelong journey that connects one’s inner sense of personality structures and preferred behaviors that give expression to that structure with varied approaches to learning. I think one best starts from an inner awareness of connectedness to the cosmos and then follows the journey to places those awarenesses can lead.

This journey, in my life, has led to an emphasis on choices that are presented in a non-directed manner so that each person can choose to give expression in class room work to what he/she loves to do. The syllabus provides a framework within which the process of learning can move creatively. The group in the class room becomes the
functional teaching mechanism for the goals and learning outcome objectives for the learner; I am at once a guide, facilitator, mentor, coach and listener, and mutual learner, as well as instructor. The group members provide support for one another and share viewpoints and experiences appropriate to the learning tasks of the day.


Learning Approaches

Approaches to learning can vary with the specific context and events in a particular setting. Some approaches that can work together include the following perspectives:

1. Culturally relevant experiential learning: the facts/content of old and new knowledge are applied in daily settings using relevant teaching/learning strategies and techniques; theories and principles of learning are connected within social and cultural contexts that show the benefit of relationships among participants (the collective) and the beauty of wisdom within the self (the individual).

2. Human information processing: the changes in processing learning within human environments moves around the process of naming learnings (content and process) and allowing the total context of knowledge to grow at small and extended levels so new artifacts (products and services) result.

3. Structure and behaviors: a person’s individual preferences on how to learn best provide the foundations/structural model in which each one of us can practice learning behaviors that increase knowledge and wisdom and provide meaningful activities through a life time. Learning models can identify starting points for problem solving; for example,

A. Experimenting to find answers (1),
B. Reflecting on ideas (2),
C. Working step-by-step (3),
D. Judging value/importance (4).

Such a model might use 4 “P’s” for describing learning as a recycling process that builds upon itself: passionate (1), Poised (2), Patient (3), and Pragmatic (4).


[11/2002]

---------------------------


ORGANIC-NATURALISIC MODELING

AARON GIVAN, Ph.D.
(Copyright. 2005. Aaron Givan. All rights reserved.)


STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS IN ORGANIZATIONS

One way to think about organizations and the functional modes necessary to make them operate is to use a naturalistic or organic approach--enough structure, like the skeleton system of the human body to support the organizational patterns [as imaged in an organizational chart by the entities named in the chart, for example] so they do not fall apart, but also, enough flexibility within the structure to allow for movement [as indicated by the connecting lines showing the relationships among the entities named within the chart]--rather like the muscle and ligaments of the human body.

The structure-dynamics relationship for human organizations can be modeled using a number of natural-organic examples from nature: for example, the leader-worker pattern in bee colonies or the various kinds of ant colonies that have been found. Individual gifts and preferences within humans can come close to the assigned functions of individual groups within these organic organizations; combining individual gifts can foster the completion of group interests/goals.

VARIABILITY

The added dimension for a human organization is the power of choice of the individuals within the structure--more rigid or more flexible, as the case may be--to work within the normal give-and-take ranges of the existing organization at any given moment. The introduction of a crisis/problem variable within the normal "activities of daily operation" (ADO) can solicit several kinds of response that demonstrate the power of individual choice:

1. Empirical needs assessment that is process and thing oriented: like a fire in an aircraft that needs immediate response by-the-numbers--rather like the larger guard ants standing guard over the workers as they do their work. In such an instance there is strong structure established by the SOP's for such situations and very defined, expected responses that still require the element of human choice.

2. Appreciative inquiry that is person and group oriented: this emphasizes the continuation of what is working and building on those elements. The group's awareness of its own functioning helps guide and facilitate the health and growth of the group with permissions and protections within the group for members to help one another define the operating rules as ADO functions are processed in the moment.


COMPOUND-COMPLEX OPERATIONS

For teaching purposes and purposes of analysis and model building, more simple elements are considered within any study of an organization--for example, models like management by walking around, theory X and theory Y, and the like.

One place to begin in such modeling studies is to understand the structure-behavior patterns within each individual within the organization; this can be done, for example, by using the MBTI type inventories suggested as part of this class and by keeping notebooks for the analysis of such patterns for the groups within which you work. A comparison of the findings from correlated studies of such notebook records can show suggestive models and ways of teaching and assessing ADO patterns.

At another level, rehearsing responses to the analyzed patterns as a group experience--talking it over together through whatever means--can allow for the more complex patterns that are present due to the power of choice and the need to maintain one's identity. How these dynamics work out becomes the acting operating dynamics in actual play in the moment.

At this point, the structure-dynamics dance among the players in the organization is compound and complex: compound in that the lines of movement within the named entities within the organizational chart have vibrancy--they are not static; complex in that the named entities are interacting in multiple ways with one another all at once at any given moment.

It's a wonder that a large organization can function at all; yet that is the beauty of human groups--they are compound-complex entities and, for me, living-organic creations...

FLEXIBILITY

Again, one way to think about organizations and the functional modes necessary to make them operate is to use a naturalistic approach--enough structure, like the skeleton system of the human body to support the organizational patterns [as imaged in an organizational chart by the entities named in the chart, for example] so they do not fall apart, but also, enough flexibility within the structure to allow for movement [as indicated by the connecting lines showing the relationships among the entities named within the chart]--rather like the muscle and ligaments of the human body.

The key for successful operations is the achievement of some kind of balance between the structure of an organization and the movements/dynamics within the structure...

Can you give examples of this balance and the tensions that go with it within your organization?


END (1-3-2008)

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SEE ALSO:
e-teachingandlearning.biz
adjunctaarongivan.info
ethicsclasses.com
appliedethics.us
churchman.net
writingsbyaaron.com
bricolagework.com
metavoicesystems.com
professionaldevelopmentinstitue.biz
artbyaaron.com
teachingandlearning.us
e-teachingandlearning.org
colorsforliving.com
bricolageworks.com
dreamanalysis.us
center4.org

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